VanderZicht Real Estate, Inc. | Whitinsville Real Estate, Uxbridge Real Estate, Sutton Real Estate


Although being a first-time buyer can seem overwhelming, there was one advantage to the entire process: You didn’t need to sell another property. If you would like to move out of the home that you’re currently living in and are in the process of buying a new place, your life is about the get complicated! Hold tight to your realtor and get ready for quite the ride. 


Since it’s often unrealistic to pay two mortgages at once, there’s a certain way that you must complete the transactions so as not to cause a huge financial headache when moving from one place to another. Unfortunately, you’re going to have to deal with buying a new home and selling your current one simultaneously in most cases.    


The good news is that it can be done! Read on for tips to find out how you can make the process go as smoothly as possible. 


First, you’ll want to understand the housing market that you’re in. You’ll know what strategies you need to employ if you understand the type of market that you’re dealing with. If the two homes are in completely different areas, this research will be even more important to you. 


Buying


While you’re searching for a new home and selling your current one, you’ll want to leave your options open. That means not locking yourself down to just one home. Of course, you’ll only put in one offer at a time, but knowing what’s out there for you to buy is important in case the purchase falls through on the first prospective home. This way you won’t have much chance of being “stranded” once your old home sells. 


Selling


You want your home to be sold in a timely manner. This means that your old home should be well-priced and ready to sell. Work with your realtor on staging, pricing, and holding open houses. The more effort that is put into marketing your home, the better chance you’ll have of selling it. Extra time on the market means that you’ll have a bigger headache when it comes to buying your new home. Selling quickly is not a bad thing so long as you have some other place to live. You can also put a contingency in the sale stating that you need to find suitable housing before you can move. Realtors can do a lot when their sellers are cooperative and proactive.           


Should You Buy First?


If you sell your home first, you’ll have an easier time getting a mortgage on a new home. The problem here is that you’ll need to find some sort of temporary housing before you even head out on the house hunt.


If you buy a home fist, your buying power may be less than if you sold your current home. Your debt-to-income ratio will be higher, giving you less money to spend on a new home.


While buying and selling a home simultaneously can be complicated, if you strategize correctly, you’ll be able to go through the entire process with ease.   

 



Single level living at it's best! Introducing the " Juniper". Front and rear covered porches ~ hardwood foyer~ kitchen ~hardwood` ss appliances ~ granite~ island. Dining room ~ hardwoods. Master bedroom with ~carpet ~ master bath~ walk in closet. Great room with gas log fireplace. 3 additional bedrooms. Two full baths and one half. Separate laundry. Two car garage ~ This is a beautiful craftsman style ranch.

More Info on this Property | New Listing Alerts


Lot 24 20 Rifleman Way, Uxbridge, MA 01569

Single-Family

$465,500
Price

7
Rooms
4
Beds
2/1
Full/Half Baths
Single level living at it's best! Introducing the " Juniper". Front and rear covered porches ~ hardwood foyer~ kitchen ~hardwood` ss appliances ~ granite~ island. Dining room ~ hardwoods. Master bedroom with ~carpet ~ master bath~ walk in closet. Great room with gas log fireplace. 3 additional bedrooms. Two full baths and one half. Separate laundry. Two car garage ~ This is a beautiful craftsman style ranch.
Open House
No scheduled Open Houses

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This Single-Family in Northbridge, MA recently sold for $300,000. This Gambrel style home was sold by Office VanderZicht - VanderZicht Real Estate, Inc..


2806 Providence Rd, Northbridge, MA 01588

Single-Family

$315,000
Price
$300,000
Sale Price

11
Rooms
4
Beds
3
Baths
. Beautifully remodeled 2200sf Dutch Colonial with decorative molding and built in's throughout. Featuring 4 bedrooms and 2 full baths, formal dining room,side sunrooms. Great first floor office space. Gleaming hardwoods and tile throughout. New roof, windows and siding. Oversized modern kitchen with new cabs,granite and ss appliances. Baths feature new vanities and tiled bath surrounds. Updated plumbing and electric. Brand new boiler. Gorgeous tongue & grooved enclosed porch. Added bonus finished basement not included in square footage which could be used as teen suite or possible in law. One car garage under. Close to Grafton line.

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In a not-so-distant future, American homeowners may not have to worry about blackouts any longer. Tesla’s giant battery recently powered up Australia’s grid after a power outage in just milliseconds. And, with new, green technologies, constantly being pursued, it could be within reach to say goodbye to blackouts once and for all.

However, we’re not quite there yet. And, if you live in the colder areas of the country, you’re also at the beginning of the worst season for snow and ice that can wreak havoc on power lines.

So, to help get you prepared, I’ve written this list of things you can do to start preparing yourself, your family, and your home for your next power outage.

Read on for the list.

1. Emergency supplies list

It’s vital to have the supplies on hand before a power outage hits so that you don’t have to be wandering around your home in the dark fishing for things you might not even have.

To avoid this, it’s a good idea to keep a supplies bag packed and tucked away somewhere safe. It’s also important that your family knows where this bag is located in case you’re away when the power goes out.

Now, let’s make your list:

  • Flashlights and batteries - Two quality flashlights with batteries should be on everyone’s emergency list. Make sure your batteries were recently bought and that they are of high quality that won’t run out of juice in just a few minutes. Also, consider including a wind-up flashlight that doesn’t require batteries for use in case you forget to replace your old batteries.

  • Radio - Most of us keep our cell phones charged up, but we’ve all been guilty of letting them get too low on charge. In these situations, it’s good to have a battery-powered radio to listen to the news.

  • Power bank - Speaking of cell phones and their poor battery life, consider buying a power bank and keeping an extra charging cord in your bag. Make a note to charge up your power bank every few weeks to ensure it will be charged when you need it most.

  • Cash - If the blackout effects more than just your neighborhood, many stores’ ATM and credit card machines may be down. It’s a good idea to have a stash of cash for emergencies.

  • Optional: generator - while you don’t need to buy a generator for your average power outage, it can help if you live in an area that experiences them frequently.

2. Familiarize yourself with your home

Find out where the shutoff valves for water are, learn the layout of your circuit breaker, and learn how to use the manual release on your garage door.

If you have an electric stove, consider purchasing and learning how to use a small propane grill for emergencies.

3. Best practices during a blackout

If you have children, make sure they know what to do if the power goes out when you’re not home. Especially during the winter months, it gets dark out early enough that many parents haven’t even arrived home from work yet. So, be sure your kids know not to start lighting candles in dangerous places and keeping the refrigerator open for extended periods.

Finally, it’s a good idea to turn off power strips and unplug appliances that were turned on when the power went out. This can stop surges from damaging your appliances and save you money.




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